Some interesting things about internet from Neelie Kroes

What does it mean to be open online?

“Sometimes, sure, creators give their work out for free and get their reward in other ways. Other times, the best way for creators to profit is to charge for access to their work. That’s not a limitation on freedom or openness, any more than paying for a newspaper is.

Most creators want their content to be as easily accessible as possible. We must give them that chance – while also acknowledging and allowing different models, so all creators can choose what works best for them.

For me, openness means giving every person a forum in which they can express themselves. Every creator a way to be rewarded and recognised for their work. The security that ensures liberty for all. And services that transparently provide the consumer with what they’ve asked for and pay for.”

Internet Freedom

“Remember how many kinds of freedom we can promote and protect online. Fundamental freedoms – like freedom of speech, and the right to privacy. The freedom to innovate, and to be rewarded and recognised for your own bright ideas in the way you think fit. And the freedom of the Internet architecture as a whole.

Of course, changing for the digital age doesn’t mean always giving material away free of charge. But it does mean we need to be open to new approaches: new ways to distribute, new ways to be rewarded for work, and new ways for people to access great online content easily.”

Copyright and innovation in the Creative Industries

“Here’s the most important change since 1998. Back then, creation and distribution were in the hands of the few. Now they are in the hands of everyone: democratizing innovation, empowering people to generate and exchange ideas, supporting and stimulating huge creativity.

And now let’s remind ourselves what our objectives as policymakers should be for the creative sector. We should help artists live from their art. Stimulate creativity and innovation. Improve consumer choice. Promote our cultural heritage. And help the sector drive economic growth.

If it took the BBC years of paperwork to market a TV programme across the EU: how does that help repay their creative investment?

The world is changing fast. Let’s not wait for ever faster technology to be ever more constrained by over more outdated legislation. Let’s not wait for the USA to speed ahead of Europe. Let’s act right now: for artists, consumers, for our economy.”